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Scottish Government asks employers to bring remote workers back to the office from 31 January

Job restrictions are softened in favour of a "hybrid" system that combines remote and in-person work


By Mireia Jimenez

Image courtesy of StartupStockPhotos via Pixabay


Addressing the Members of the Scottish Parliament (MSPs) on 26 January, Nicola Sturgeon justified easing restrictions due to the significant decline of Covid-19 cases in Scotland.


She recommends a gradual return to the office, saying, “We would not expect to see a wholesale return to the office next week - indeed, given that the level of infection though falling remains high, a mass return at this stage is likely to set progress back.”


In addition, physical distance rules in specific settings where facemasks are not required, such as churches, will be reduced to 1 metre.


From 24 January the prohibition of large indoor events was lifted, an action that brought a “significant return to normality” according to Sturgeon.


The First Minister communicated to the MSPs that within a week, Covid-19 cases declined “just over a quarter,” from 10,000 to 7,000 per day.

The Gaudie contacted the University to ask if these changes will affect staff and lecturers who until now have been working from home.


A University spokesperson said, “While we do not expect to see an immediate wholesale return to either hybrid or office working, we do anticipate more staff - beyond the increasing numbers already on campus for teaching and other activities now the second half-session is underway - will begin to return to campus.”


“The new guidance paves the way for a phased return to our hybrid working arrangements introduced last year. These were paused following guidance issued in December in response to the Omicron variant, which resulted in many staff working entirely from home unless their activities could only be delivered effectively on campus, for example, teaching, research, or other essential services.


“Along with the return of our students, this is a welcome development and indicative of what we sincerely hope is more normality.”